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NEW ALBUM

KICKS

RICKIE LEE JONES - NEW ALBUM ‘KICKS’


Rickie Lee Jones is that rare musician who has transcended the singer/songwriter mantle by incorporating different radio genres from the get-go and she continues that tradition on her forthcoming album KICKS, her newest collection of songs from the great American songbook. Due out June 7, the album spans two decades (50s-70s) of pop, rock and jazz, presenting her unique and sophisticated interpretations of these songs.

Miss Jones’ own label, OSOD (other side of desire) released KICKS with Thirty Tigers distributing. The past decade has seen her team up with manager Ron Stone (Nirvana, Bonnie Raitt, among others) and her team is innovating a new fund-raising campaign to promote this project. A pre-order of the self-released album is available here, along with a variety of official KICKS merchandise including t-shirts, posters, totes and other items.

It is fitting that one of the American treasures of songwriters should be comfortable with this diverse collection of the great songwriters of the 20th century--she is one of them. On KICKS, she brings emotion to sleeper album tracks like “My Fathers Gun” and her tongue-in-cheek humor to songs like “Houston.” The album will be previewed by the infectious, insistent track of hope “Lonely People,” which arrives at radio April 19; it was a Top Five Billboard hit in 1974, originally recorded by America. The song will be available as an instant grat track that same day with the purchase of the pre-release of the album.

Weaving the connection between 70’s rock and 50’s jazz was no leap for JONES. “It is all part of what I heard growing up,” says JONES. “The radio played everything! 1960’s AM radio was the primordial zone for our musical life today. As a kid I heard R&B, country, rock, and the most sophisticated singer-songwriters of the day forming their genre. Radio was a college education for a budding musician because these songs are all playing on my internal radio all the time, it’s not a stretch for me to put them together on an LP. Really, I just love to sing.”

KICKS was created entirely in New Orleans, using local musicians, mixers and studios. Produced by RICKIE LEE JONES with her band-mate, vibraphonist Mike Dillion, it features 10 songs of a highly infectious nature. Check out “Nagasaki,” her traditional jazz offering of tight three-part harmonies, and “Bad Company,” where JONES cuts loose on electric guitar.

The album cover, by artist Peregrine Honig, is a super-hero woman in boxing gloves. Sound like anyone we know? RICKIE LEE JONES, superhero, with a super weapon smile! “In times like these,” Miss Jones smiles, “a smile can be subversive. Here is Rickie Lee’s musical smile.”

The KICKS track listing is as follows: 1. “Bad Company” (Bad Company, 1974) 2. “My Fathers Gun” (Elton John, 1970) 3. “Lonely People” (America, 1974) 4. “Houston” (Sanford Clark, 1964; made famous by Dean Martin, 1965) 5. “You’re Nobody ‘Til Somebody Loves You” (Russ Morgan, 1944; made famous by Dean Martin, 1960/1964) 6. “Nagasaki” (Ipana Troubadours, 1928; most famous by Benny Goodman Quartet, 1952) 7. “Mack The Knife” (Louis Armstrong, 1956; made famous by Bobby Darin, 1958) 8. “Quicksilver Girl” (Steve Miller Band, 1968) 9. “End Of The World” (Skeeter Davis, 1962) 10. “Cry” (Ruth Casey, 1951; made famous by Johnnie Ray and the Four Lads, 1951)

Kicks - Rickie Lee Jones

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Rickie Lee Jones Announces Vinyl Reissues of Self-Titled Debut and Pirates

After years out of print, Rickie Lee Jones’ first two albums will be available on LP. Rickie’s self-titled debut album and the lauded follow up Pirates were re-released digitally and on CD via AWAL Recordings in the latter half of 2018. Now they will receive their long overdue vinyl reissues on January 18.

Pre order Rickie Lee Jones - vinyl

Pre order Pirates - vinyl

Listen to Rickie Lee Jones and Pirates on Spotify:

Rickie Lee Jones skyrocketed to fame in 1979 when as a barely known artist she appeared on Saturday Night Live. Performing her biggest hit “Chuck E’s In Love” in her trademark red beret, Time Magazine instantly dubbed her “the Duchess of Coolsville.” Since then she has gone on to win two Grammy Awards, appeared on the cover of Rolling Stone twice, and included in VH1’s 100 Greatest Women of Rock & Roll.

Released in 1979, her self-titled debut on Warner Brothers won her the Grammy Award for Best New Artist and reached #3 on the Billboard Albums chart. The album’s brilliant songs include the exceptional "On Saturday Afternoons in 1963", the haunting "Last Chance Texaco", and the popular "Chuck E’s In Love", a top 5 pop single. Check out Jones' Coolsville 1979 Trilogy featuring the music videos for "Coolsville", "Young Blood", and "Chuck E's in Love".

Watch the Coolsville 1979 Trilogy

Two years after that Grammy-winning debut, Jones released her much anticipated sophomore effort Pirates, which was awarded 5/5 stars by Rolling Stone and called “a remarkable piece of work” by The New York Times. The album featured an all-star band supporting Rickie, including Steely Dan’s Donald Fagen, Victor Feldman, and trumpeter Randy Brecker.

Longtime Times music critic Jon Pareles said "The few unconventional songs on (her debut album) hardly foreshadowed what Miss Jones would attempt - and pull off - on '’Pirates’ in 1981…'Pirates' was unabashedly ambitious.”

In recent years, Pirates' reputation has continued to grow. British magazine The Word included the record as one of pop music’s 25 Most Underrated Albums of All Time while NPR Music listed it on their 150 Greatest Albums Made by Women.

Contemporaneous with that chart’s publication, Rickie performed the album in its entirety as part of NPR’s “Turning the Tables” live show at Lincoln Center’s Damrosch Park in 2017. On the NPR site, in a feature about Pirates, Alison Fensterstock said, "Few pop artists have ever been as effortlessly cool; still fewer have managed to create a piece of art that sounds like it could have been crafted thirty years before it was, or thirty years after. Pirates has been influential, but rarely imitated. Who could?"